Indian Interpreter to Portray Andrew Montour

Indian Interpreter William Hunt to Portray Andrew Montour, founder of Montoursville, PA
Indian Interpreter William Hunt to Portray Andrew Montour, founder of Montoursville, PA.
The past comes comes alive as Montoursville's namesake, Andrew Montour, returns to the area as portrayed by historian and re-enactor William Hunt.

Hosted by Northcentral Chapter 8, Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology and Lycoming County Historical Society, Hunt will offer two programs: one for Montoursville Area High School students only, at 10 a.m. March 28  at the Thomas Taber Museum, and one for the public, at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 29 at Montoursville High School. The event is free.

Montour was an important interpreter and negotiator in Pennsylvania, New York and Virginia in the latter half of the 18th century. A frontier diplomat, warrior and hero of the French and Indian war, he was a member of the Iroquois Grand Council. His missions were vital to colonial America.

Montour 's role cannot be diminished because of his mixed Native American and European blood. The fact that he had a foot in both worlds made him one of the colonial period's most complex, but effective, characters. 

NCC8 Prez to Talk Prehistory

Tank Baird
Tom "Tank" Baird, right, president of Northcentral Chapter 8, Society for PA Archaeology,
and Mary Ann Levine, professor of archaeology at Franklin & Marshall, at the Taber Museum.

The Thomas T. Taber Museum of the Lycoming County Historical Society has announced the first program of its 2014 Lecture Series, which combines its Coffee Hours on Thursday mornings with its Society Programs on Sunday afternoons. The theme of this year’s Lecture Series is an examination of American Indian/Native American culture.

On Thursday, March 13, 2014 at 10am, Tom ‘Tank’ Baird will be speaking on “The Very First Settlers of the West Branch Valley.” He will relate the importance of maize which was first cultivated in the 9th century by the Owasco culture of central New York. The subsequent colonization of the Susquehanna drainage for this farming was the first major occupation of Native Americans.